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1. Welcome  to Overview  of  The  Training  Process Dyah Pramanik,  MM TRAINING  AND   DEVELOPING  EMPLOYEES Overview  of  The  Training  Process Dyah…
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  • 1. Welcome  to Overview  of  The  Training  Process Dyah Pramanik,  MM TRAINING  AND   DEVELOPING  EMPLOYEES Overview  of  The  Training  Process Dyah Pramanik,  MM [ ] Copyright © 2011 PearsonEducation, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall
  • 2. 8–2 PPT 5_1_b TRAINING AND DEVELOPING EMPLOYEES: Overview of The Training Process
  • 3. 8–3 LEARNING OUTCOMES 1. Describe and illustrate how you would identify training requirements. 2. Explain how to distinguish between problems you can fix with training and those you can’t. 1. Describe and illustrate how you would identify training requirements. 2. Explain how to distinguish between problems you can fix with training and those you can’t.
  • 4. The Training Process
  • 5. 8–5 Training • Is the process of teaching new employees the basic skills they need to perform their jobs • Is a hallmark of good management • Reduces an employer’s exposure to negligent training liability
  • 6. 8–6 Training’s Strategic Context • The aims of firm’s training programs must make sense in terms of the company’s strategic goals. • Training fosters employee learning, which results in enhanced organizational performance.
  • 7. 8–7 Steps in the Training Process 1 2 3 4 The Four-Step Training Process Instructional design Needs analysis Program implementation Evaluation
  • 8. Training, Learning, and Motivation
  • 9. 8–9 Make the Learning Meaningful 1. At the start of training, provide a bird’s-eye view of the material to be presented to facilitate learning. 2. Use a variety of familiar examples. 3. Organize the information so you can present it logically, and in meaningful units. 4. Use terms and concepts that are already familiar to trainees. 5. Use as many visual aids as possible. 6. Create a perceived training need in trainees’ minds.
  • 10. 8–10 Make Skills Transfer Easy 1. Maximize the similarity between the training situation and the work situation. 2. Provide adequate practice. 3. Label or identify each feature of the machine and/or step in the process. 4. Direct the trainees’ attention to important aspects of the job. 5. Provide “heads-up,” preparatory information that lets trainees know what might happen back on the job.
  • 11. 8–11 Reinforce the Learning 1. Trainees learn best when the trainers immediately reinforce correct responses, perhaps with a quick “well done.” 2. The schedule is important. The learning curve goes down late in the day, so that “full day training is not as effective as half the day or three-fourths of the day.”
  • 12. 8–12 Analyzing Training Needs Task Analysis: Assessing new employees’ training needs Performance Analysis: Assessing current employees’ training needs Training Needs Analysis
  • 13. TABLE 8–1 Sample Task Analysis Record Form
  • 14. FIGURE 8–2 Example of Competency Model for Human Resource Manager
  • 15. 8–15 Performance Analysis: Assessing Current Employees’ Training Needs Performance Appraisals Job-Related Performance Data Observations Interviews Assessment Center Results Individual Diaries Attitude Surveys Tests Specialized Software Can’t-do or Won’t-do? Methods for Identifying Training Needs
  • 16. 8–16 K E Y T E R M S § employee orientation § training § negligent training § task analysis § competency model § performance analysis § on-the-job training (OJT) § apprenticeship training § job instruction training (JIT) § programmed learning § electronic performance support systems (EPSS) § job aid § virtual classroom § lifelong learning § management development § job rotation § action learning § case study method § management game § role playing § behavior modeling § in-house development center § executive coach § organizational development § controlled experimentation Copyright © 2011 PearsonEducation, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • 17. 8–17 All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  may  be  reproduced,   stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted,  in  any  form  or  by  any   means,  electronic,  mechanical,  photocopying,  recording,  or   otherwise,  without  the  prior  written  permission  of  the  publisher.   Printed  in  the  United  States  of  America. Copyright © 2011 PearsonEducation, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall
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