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His or Hers a versatile overshot scarf WENDY SUNDQUIST Fifteen years ago I visited a wonderful Swedish museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and fell in love with an old boundweave rosepath coverlet from the late 1800s. I loved the design, but I wanted to weave a similar-looking fabric that was lightweight so it would drape nicely in a garment. After searching through books of old overshot coverlet patterns, I planned this piece as an overshot version of the boundweave coverlet design. R osepath
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  R  osepath usually refers to an extend-ed point-twill threading: 1-2-3-4-1-4-3-2-1; the thread on shaft 1 inthe center of the repeat allows a larger di-amond than can be woven with a simplepoint. When used for boundweave, thisthreading allows greater design potentialthan a simple point even though shaft 1at the center of the threading weaves withshaft 1 on the outer edges. The drawbackto boundweave, however (in addition toits not being appropriate for a scarf!) isthe many, many picks per inch requiredto weave it. The draft for the scarf The most straightforward way to extendrosepath to overshot is to use a rosepaththreading order for the four overshotblocks: ABCDADCBA. My overshotdraft, however, uses a simple pointarrangement of the blocks, ABCDCBA,since I liked the design it creates better,and it still makes possible the look of theblock design in the coverlet. In overshot, pattern picks always al-ternate with tabby picks (this is what ismeant by “use tabby” in drafts where pat-tern picks only are shown; see Figure 1,page 3). To set off the color changes inthe bands pattern weft in this scarf, twotabby picks are used between the patternpicks at every color change. The extratabby pick gives added definition to thecolored bands, an effect that is not foundin traditional overshot patterns. For further exploration This small overshot threading is one of my favorites and is amazingly versatile.The treadling order of the four blocks canbe varied endlessly for different designsand effects. Put on an extra two yards inthe warp so that you can weave twoscarves—one that follows the treadlinggiven and one for “designing on theloom” after you’ve become familiar withthe pattern elements.The ground cloth for this scarf is un-mercerized cotton. You can also choosepearl cotton—or consider 30/2 silk.One caution: because of its plain-weave ground cloth, overshot is more likeplain weave than twill in terms of drape.Be very careful not to beat too firmly(with narrow warps, the weft packs inmuch more easily than with wide warps).You want a piece to wrap around yourneck, not a cover for your bed!  Wendy Sundquist of Langley, Washington,has been a productionweaver for fifteen years.She owns Karlson/GrayGallery in Langley. His or Hers a versatile overshot scarf WENDY SUNDQUIST Fifteen years ago I visited a wonderful Swedish museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and fell in love with an old boundweave rosepath coverlet from the late 1800s. I loved the design, but I wanted to weave a similar-looking fabric that was lightweight so it would drape nicely in a garment. After searching through books of old overshot coverlet patterns, I planned this piece as an overshot version of the boundweave coverlet design. © Handwoven ® magazine, Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. www.handwovenmagazine.com 1    A point threading of four overshot blocks allows a great many different designs.  © Handwoven ® magazine, Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. www.handwovenmagazine.com 2  STEPS FOR WEAVING THE OVERSHOT SCARF  Weave structure for scarf Overshot. Equipment  4-shaft loom, 7 weaving width; 8-dent reed; raddle; 5 shuttles, 5 bobbins (or 2 shuttles, 5 bobbins).  Yarns  Warp: 20/2 unmercerized cotton (8,400 yd/lb), black, 605 yd (1 1  ⁄  6 oz). Tabby weft: 20/2 unmercerized cotton(8,400 yd/lb), black, 220 yd ( 1  ⁄  2 oz).Pattern weft: 30/2 silk (7,850 yd/lb),silk/seacell, gold #540, 157 yd ( 1  ⁄  3 oz);spun silk, rust red #73, 21 yd; tussahsilk, gold-orange #436, 16 yd and red-orange #15, 166 yd. 30/2 spun silk (#73) in similar colors can be used for the tussah and silk/seacell yarns.  Yarn sources 20/2 unmercerized cotton is available fromBlomqvist/Nordiska and 30/2 tussah, spunsilk, and silk seacell from The Silk Tree.  Warp order and length 220 ends 2 3  ⁄  4  yd long (allows 4 take-up,34 loom waste; loom waste includes fringeand testing picks). Add 2 yd to warp lengthfor each additional scarf.  Warp and weft spacing  Warp: 32 epi (4 ends/dent in an 8-dent reed). Width in the reed: 6 7   ⁄  8 .  Weft: about 32 picks per inch (16 tabby,16 pattern). Woven length of scarf (mea-sured under tension on the loom): 60 . Finished dimensions  After washing, amounts produce one scarf 5 5  ⁄  8 × 55 plus 5 fringe at each end. PROJECT AT-A-GLANCE Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7  Wind a warp of 220 ends, 2 3  ⁄  4  ydlong with a cross at both ends: athreading cross and a raddle cross(see Resources at www.handwovenmagazine.com for back-to-front warp-ing steps with two crosses). Group thenumber of ends in the raddle cross that  you will place in each dent of your rad-dle at a sett of 32 ends per inch.Spread the warp in the raddle, securethe warp to the apron rod of the back beam, and beam the warp without lease sticks, checking for tangles as yougo. Place sticks or heavy craft paper between the layers. Pull on the warpfrequently to straighten the threads. Place lease sticks in the threadingcross, secure them behind the castle,and thread following Figure 1. The first and last 4 working ends are doubledin the threading (they can be thread-ed in the same heddle). Sley 4ends/dent in an 8-dent reed and tiethe warp onto the front beam apronrod under even tension. Weave 5–6 picks of plain weave witha worsted-weight wool yarn. Weave3–4 picks of plain weave with black 20/2 cotton, then weave 4 patternpicks in each pattern block, alternat-ing 20/2 cotton tabby with one of thesilk pattern wefts; check and correct any threading errors. Allowing 6 for fringe after your testing picks, beginthe scarf by weaving 4 picks of  worsted-weight wool as a header. 1. Draft forscarf  www.handwovenmagazine.com 3 © Handwoven ® magazine, Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. 11111144442GGGGGGOGOGOGOGORORORORORORORRRORR plain weave(tabby)Use tabby:Weave a tabbypick before everypattern pick.Weave 2 tabby picks at allcolor changes. RRRRRRRRRRRR22222222222222222222222222222222222222226222222222222222222222226633363662423333433333332211144444 1122233322111222245612345612345622411142422222222222222222222226222222222222222222663233322411142433888888883224 10x 10x 16x 12x 11x GGGGGGGOGOGORORORORRG = goldRR = rust redGO = gold-orangeRO = red-orangeRORRRRGGG cont'dcont'dfirst borderbody of scarfsecondbordercont'd temperature. (Add a bit of fabric soft-ener to the rinse water if you think youoverbeat.) Gently squeeze out excess water and hang to dry. Using a woolsetting, iron directly on the fabric sur-face to polish the silk. Trim weft tailsand fringe ends. Weave 4 picks plain weave to beginthe scarf. Then follow the treadling inFigure 1. Numbers indicate the num-ber of times to use each pattern trea-dle, alternating with tabby. (Note that floating selvedges are not used for thisscarf; the pattern weft therefore some-times turns inside the edges. Add float-ing selvedges if desired.) Weave 2tabby picks before each new pattern- weft color. To begin or end pattern wefts, take tails around edge threadand back into the shed. Beat gently,aiming for 16 pattern picks per inch.End with 4 picks plain weave withtabby weft and then 4 picks worsted wool. Measure 6 and weave 2 picks worsted wool. Use the 2 picks as a cut-ting line to cut the scarf from the loom.Cut the warp at the other end of thescarf along the edge of the testingpicks. Prepare a twisted fringe, work-ing from the center out, cutting and re-moving the wool weft as you go. Twist two groups of 8 ends in the same di-rection until they kink, let the two groupstwist together in the opposite direction,and secure with an overhand knot.  Wash by hand in lukewarm water  with a handful of Orvus Paste or asquirt of mild dish soap. Agitate gen-tly for about 45 seconds. Let soak for 10 minutes. Rinse in water of the same
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